Metal Flower Installation Tracks The Heat Of The Sun

Metal Flower Installation Tracks The Heat Of The Sun

USC architect Doris Sung  wants to make buildings responsive to changes in the environment.  With 'Bloom', a 20-foot-tall undulating installation in Silver Lake, Los Angeles, Sung has made these ideas a reality.  Made out of thermobimetal, that curls when heated, this metal flower's responsive surface shades and ventilates specific areas of its form as the sun heats up its surface. In other words, 'Bloom' is not merely a zero-energy sun-tracking device that indexes time and temperature, but a structure that actually reacts to changing environmental conditions.

For a long time, my work has examined why architecture is static and nonresponsive, and why it can't be more flexible like clothing. Why do we have to adapt to architecture rather than architecture responding to us? Why can't buildings be animated? ~ Doris Sung

'Bloom' is made possible through a collaboration between Los Angeles architects Doris Sung, Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter and structural engineer Matthew Melnyk. On display at M&A exhibit courtyard, November 17th 2011 until Spring 2012

via M&A and DO|SU

Metal Flower Installation Tracks The Heat Of The Sun

Metal Flower Installation Tracks The Heat Of The Sun

Metal Flower Installation Tracks The Heat Of The Sun

Metal Flower Installation Tracks The Heat Of The Sun

  • Metametastasis

    That’s a fancy looking cheese grater.